We Are Off Again

May 31, 2017 6:44 pm | Posted by Graham D

Graham D is back after a number of years researching the vineyards of Northern Greenland “one of my favourite wines has to be icewine”

His new schedule of Blogs will commence in early June 2017 and will feature articles on individual and often unique wines, spirits and liqueurs – of course by popular demand a whole new series of Food and Wine Pairing.

There will be a lots of info on Gins this time , since it’s UK’s most popular spirit.

Bewarned some other unpredictable events may also occur ???

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Pairing Wine with the Last of the Summer Fruits

October 1, 2012 12:25 pm | Posted by Del

Pairing Wine with the Last of the Summer Fruits

FOOD and WINE PAIRINGPAIRING WINE WITH THE LAST OF THE SUMMER FRUITS
(continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 29 July 2012)

INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

CHALLENGES : The main challenges when matching various fruits are often the differences in the acidity and ripeness of the fruit, for example the soft sweet flavours of a ripe pear and the slightly tartness of a late season raspberry. The key to this type of pairing is to match the weights and sugar intensity of both the wine and the fruit and to ensure one is not overpowering the other.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Apricot based dessert : goes well with a rich and flavoursome Sauternes – Chateau Rolland 

Blackberries : an outstanding match would be a wine of great depth Black Noble, De Bortoli Wines, Australia 

Blueberries : a superb partner would be a refreshing and energetic Emeri Sparkling Shiraz

Autumn Raspberries from Scotland : require a full bodied and luscious Muscat such as Muscat de Beaumes de Venise Tradition from the Rhone Valley.

Apple Crumble : go for a light delicate dessert wine from New Zealand Hukapapa Riesling, Hunters Wines, Marlborough

Pears Poached in Red Wine : will appreciate a quality  Sparkling Rose, Saumur Rose Brut, Ackerman, France 

Honey-Roasted Figs : this deliciously sticky dessert works well with the fresh fruity taste of Pineau des Charentes.

 

MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on THE MARRIAGE OF FOOD AND WINE to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also view GREAT FRIENDS – CHEESE AND WINE for cheese and wine pairing.

 

NEXT ARTICLE: Partridge,Pheasant, Teal and Mullard

HAPPY PAIRING WINE  WITH THE LAST OF THE SUMMER FRUITS

Graham D

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Cold Meats

December 19, 2011 1:54 pm | Posted by Graham D

FOOD and WINE PAIRING—Cold Meats (continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 10 December 2011)

INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–Many tasty Cold Meats can be left over from Christmas and New Years Day. If we focus on Poultry, Game Birds and Pork, then there are numerous wine options available for consideration. Cold Pork Pies or Game Bird pies can also be considered under the following recommendations. 

CHALLENGES:—–Be careful that strong Pickles and Chutneys such as Piccalilli or strong mustard based sauces may conflict with some of the wines recommended. Fruit chutneys and mild sauces will not be a major problem.

 RECOMMENDATIONS:—–The first recommendation which will accompany all the meats in question and is not too powerful, Rose D’Anjou  from the Loire, a refreshing wine for any time of the day or night. Many heavy reds will overpower most cold white meats, therefore for red wine lovers , a perfect match would be a light fruity Pinot Noir from Australia, Pirie South Pinot Noir,Tasmania. My final recommendation is a full bodied white wine from the Rhone , Chateauneuf du Pape Blanc , the long lasting spicy flavours match well both cold meats, pork pies or game pies.   
 
MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on The Marriage of Food and Wine  to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also Great Friends-Cheese and Wine  for cheese and wine pairing.
 
NEXT ARTICLE:—–Wild Game including Venison and Wild Boar

HAPPY COLD MEATS PAIRING DAYS

Graham D

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Christmas Seafood Starters

December 12, 2011 11:04 am | Posted by Graham D

FOOD and WINE PAIRING—Christmas Seafood Starter
(continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 28 November 2011)

 INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

 FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–With Christmas Dinner’s main dish being so wholesome and filling, often a light starter such as prawns with avocado, green salad and a seafood mayonaise base sauce is certainly more than sufficient. One can substitute the prawns for either crab, lobster or fresh water crayfish.

 CHALLENGES:—–The challenges are not too difficult if one selects a dry or medium dry white wine. When matching white wine with crustaceans, try to favour wines with a fruity bias, since they can add much piquancy to the food in question. If the dish contains no seafood mayonaise sauce and only green salad, then a much drier white wine can be accomodated.

 RECOMMENDATIONS:—–Whether its prawns, crab, lobster or crayfish a rich fruity wine from the Loire such as Vouvray cannot be faulted as a great partner. A similar wine, but more flowery, which definitely would make a good friend of seafood and happens to be my favorite white wine, a  Gewurztraminer from Alsace.  The last but not least  recommendation would have to be a wine from New Zealand the land of seafood, Chardonnay , this wine has the correct balance of fruit and acidity to support any rich seafood dishes and also, its most enjoyable on its own.
 
MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on The Marriage of Food and Wine to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also Great Friends-Cheese and Wine  for cheese and wine pairing.
 
NEXT ARTICLE:—–Poultry for Christmas

 

HAPPY CHRISTMAS SEAFOOD STARTER PAIRING DAYS

 

Graham D

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FOOD and WINE PAIRING -SMOKED FOODS

May 11, 2010 11:29 am | Posted by Graham D

FOOD and WINE PAIRING–SMOKED FOODS (continuation from blog ” Food and Wine Pairing ” dated 3rd April 2010

INTRODUCTION:—This blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—SMOKED FOODS including SMOKED TROUT,SMOKED SALMON,SMOKED MACKEREL,SMOKED EEL,SMOKED HALIBUT,SMOKED HAM,SMOKED CHICKEN,SMOKED DUCK and SMOKED GOOSE.

CHALLENGES:—It is important that strong smoked foods are not fighting against the wine and vice versa . Fish and meat which have been smoked do have the same initial smoky taste and influence, but when moving further into the taste experience, the type of fish or meat you are eating should come through even though the overall smoky influence will still be there – this similar smoky taste generally allows you to choose similar wines for both fish and meat.

RECOMMENDATIONS:—Heavily oaked white wines can sometimes be a little overbearing, but they do have one good and most loyal friend, that being smoked fish. Good examples would be Wakefield Chardonnay from Australia or Hunter’s Chardonnay from New Zealand.

Smoked meats also go well with the two above mentioned Chardonnay’s and red wines well oaked with lots of vanilla flavours well support smoked meats, wines from  Riojas and Ribera del Duero such as Rioja Anares Tinto Crianza, Bodega Olarra and Portia Ribera del Duero Bodegas Portia do a grand job in matching smoked meats. These red wines also make an alternative and agreeable match with some fish dishes which include traditionally smoked eel and mackerel.

A very dry sherry like  Dry Sac Fino,Williams & Humbert  or a dry white port such as Sandeman White Apitiv  make a different and very interesting marriage and will certainly suit and match most smoked meats, fish and shellfish.

MAIN DIRECTORY:—click on The Marriage of Food and Wine to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters,soups,main courses and desserts. Also Great Friends-Cheese and Wine for cheese and wine pairing.

NEXT ARTICLE:—Tuna, Marlin and Swordfish

 

 

HAPPY SMOKED FOODS AND WINE PAIRING DAYS

Graham D 

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FOOD and WINE PAIRING—SHELLFISH

April 3, 2010 4:20 pm | Posted by Graham D

FOOD and WINE PAIRING—SHELLFISH (continuation from blog 

 “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 4th February 2010 )

 

INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–SHELLFISH including PRAWNS, LANGOSTINE, OYSTERS, CLAMS, MUSSELS, SCALLOPS, CRAB and LOBSTER

 

CHALLENGES:—–Delicate shellfish need due care and attention, beware and stay away from strongly oaked wines. You should seek out crisp dry white wines, new world sauvignon blancs, dry champagne or a quality sparkling wine will do the job very well. Shellfish cooked with, cheese, cream or herbs do support a much broader range of wines.

 
RECOMMENDATIONS:—–When eating live shellfish try a very dry and crisp Muscadet  or a more up market Pouilly-Fume, both from the Loire Valley.

When enjoying rich dishes like Devilled Crab, Lobster Newburgh or Lobster Thermidor, then you could choose from all three colours and good recommendations would be a light red from the Loire—Saumur Champigny, a fine and sturdy rose from Australia—Willowglen Rose  or a buttery Chardonnay from New Zealand— Hunter’s of Marlborough.

Lightly cooked Scallops, Clams or Mussels in a white wine sauce go exceedingly well with New World Sauvignon Blancs or a Mortitx Blanc from the island of Mallorca.

Prawns, Shrimp and Langostine dishes cooked in richer style sauces (not curry spices) are very well suited to more full bodied whites like Chateaunuef du Pape  from the Rhone Valley and a rich Chilean Chardonnay from Millaman.

 

MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on The Marriage of Food and Wine  to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also  Great Friends-Cheese and Wine  for cheese and wine pairing.

 

NEXT ARTICLE:—–Smoked food including,  smoked trout, smoked salmon, smoked mackerel, smoked eel, smoked halibut, smoked ham, smoked chicken , smoked duck and smoked goose.
 
HAPPY  SHELLFISH AND WINE PAIRING DAYS

Graham D

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FOOD and WINE PAIRING-WILD GAME

February 4, 2010 10:40 am | Posted by Graham D

FOOD and WINE PAIRING—WILD GAME (continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 9th January  2010)

 INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–WILD GAME DISHES, including PHEASANT, PARTRIDGE, WILD MALLARD, PIGEON, RABBIT, HARE, VENISON and WILD BOAR.

CHALLENGES:—–Wild game varies in taste quite a bit, one has the light and flavoursome meats of partridge and pheasant, middle of the range in taste would be rabbit, pigeon and mallard and the strongest tasting meats would be venison, wild boar and especially hare. The challenge is selecting wines to match all three different groups

  RECOMMENDATIONS:—–Big or robust red wines of quality will go well with all three categories of feathered or furred game mentioned above and classic matches would be a full bodied Crozes Hermitage from the Northern Rhone or a well matured Barossa Shiraz from Australia.

If we focus on the lighter meats like pheasant and partridge then there a number of  white or rose wines that would hold their own if the meat is roasted or served with light sauces. Try a full flavoured Chablis Premier Cru such as  from the estate of Tremblay or a Gisborne Viognier from New Zealand. For a rose go for the highly recommended Whispering Angel. A light bodied red wine suited to this particular category would be a juicy red Chinon from the Loire Valley.

Rabbit, pigeon and mallard  all love medium to full bodied red  ranging from Pinot Noirs like those from Oregan and Volnay and Pommard  from Burgundy, to a fruity Hawkes Bay Merlot from the Southern Hemisphere’s New Zealand. These same four red wines are well suited to Rabbit Stew or Pie and also Cold Game Pie.

Venison, Wild Boar and Hare do prefer complex and more full bodied red wines of character and style. Two big boys that immediately come to mind are of course Chateaunuef-du-Pape from the lower Rhone region of France and a quality red from Ribera del Duero from the north east of Spain. If you are brave and considering the famed game dish of Jugged Hare, then the intense and fruity wines from Gigondas and Vacqueyras will the perfect match.

 
MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on The Marriage of Food and Wine  to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also Great Friends-Cheese and Wine  for cheese and wine pairing.

 NEXT ARTICLE:—–Shellfish dishes, including prawns, langostine, clams, mussels, scallops, crab and lobster

 
HAPPY  WILD GAME AND WINE PAIRING DAYS
Graham D

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FOOD and WINE PAIRING – POULTRY

January 13, 2010 2:51 pm | Posted by Graham D

(continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 26th November  2009)

 

INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–POULTRY DISHES, including CHICKEN, TURKEY, GUINEA FOWL, GOOSE, QUAIL and FARMED DUCK

CHALLENGES:—–Poultry is an enjoyable challenge, mainly because most red , white and rose wines match most poultry dishes if we put to one side hot and spicy dishes like chicken curry. People who prefer white wines should stay with their favourite white wine and the same advise would be valid for red, rose and  sparkling wine lovers. My only no go area would be dessert or fortified wines.

 
RECOMMENDATIONS:—–grilled or roast chicken, for a white wine enthusiast  try a Viognier style wine like The Black Chook, no pun intended.  A cheese and chicken dish like Chicken Kiev goes very well with a Reserve Chardonnay or a light to medium red Beaujolias Cru such as Moulin-a-Vent.  Moving on to the slightly darker meat of guinea Fowl, Goose and farmed Duck, these will pair up well with a full bodied white wine from the Rhone or you can try a subtle red Cru Bourgeois from the Medoc in France, also either wine would pair well with Canard a l’ Orange.

Turkey normally associated with Christmas is now eaten all the year round and again well suited to a good Rose from Sancerre or Provence, a medium bodied Merlot from Chile or a fine sparkling Saumur from the Loire, France. The same three wines are also a perfect match for Quail and one of Portugal’s favourite chicken dishes Piri Piri.

 

MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on the Marriage of Food and Wine to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and deserts. Also Great Friends Cheese and Wine for cheese and wine pairing.

 

NEXT ARTICLE:—–Wild game dishes, including pheasant, partridge, wild mallard and venison
 

HAPPY  POULTRY AND WINE PAIRING DAYS

Graham D

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FOOD and WINE PAIRING – BEEF DISHES

November 26, 2009 3:01 pm | Posted by Graham D

-(continuation from blog  Food and Wine pairing  dated 10th November  2009)

 

 

 INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

 

FOOD BEING FEATURED:—–BEEF DISHES, including  ROAST BEEF GRILLED SIRLOIN STEAK, GRILLED RUMP STEAK, GRILLED T BONE STEAK, GRILLED FILLET STEAK, GRILLED RIB EYE STEAK, GRILLED ENTRECOTE STEAK,  BEEF EN CROUT and BEEF STEWS  ( Venison dishes  would also be a good alternative )

 

 CHALLENGES:—–Good beef dishes are the main stay of so many different countries and the dishes can range from simply grilled Entrecote Steak to a substantial Casserole such as Brasato al Barolo (Beef in Barolo wine). The wine challenges are not too difficult since most people opt for and enjoy red wines with beef and preferably full bodied wines. On saying that, whether lightly grilled  beef steak or a big big winter beef stew most styles red wines will suffice, with Cabernet Sauvignon being a favourite of many.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS:—–Simply grilled beef with light sauces but no mustard can make good friends with light bodied reds such as a fruit driven Fleurie or Brouilly from Beaujolias, simarilly from Italy a good quality Valpolicella will hit the right mark.  If we move to upmarket dishes like Beef en Crout  then wines of fine pedigree should come into play like an aged St. Emilion or a smooth full bodied  Margaux from the Medoc.

 

The big beefy dishes such as Boeuf Bourguignon  or a traditional British slow cooked Braised Beef do enjoy the company of big and weighty wines like a Shiraz from Clare Valley Australia, a Zinfandel from Chile, or an oaky Rioja Gran Reserva from Spain. Two other favourites of mine to match most beef dishes are from Italy, one being a Chianti Classico Reserva, the other a full bodied red from Montepulciano. Both these Italian wines would also make a superb match with a firm old favourite—Beef Stroganoff.

 

MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on The Marriage of Food and Wine to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also Great Friends – Cheese and Wine for cheese and wine pairing.

 

 

 

NEXT ARTICLE:—–Poultry dishes, including chicken, turkey, guinea fowl, goose and farmed duck.

 

 

HAPPY  BEEF  AND WINE PAIRING DAYS

 

Graham D

 

 

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