Hawkshead Wines from Central Otago in New Zealand

August 3, 2013 11:53 am | Posted by Del

Hawkshead Vineyard is located on the road between Queenstown and Cromwell in the Gibbston “Valley of Wines” in the heart of Central Otago, New Zealands southernmost wine growing region, known for its high quality Pinot Noir Wines. The Gibbston Valley is 20 minutes drive from Queenstown, the lifestyle and adventure capital of New zealand.

Vines have been grown in the Gibbston Valley, Central Otago since 1976. It was one of the areas in the region that Italian based viticulturist Romeo Braggato first predicted, in 1895, to be of great potential for the production of Pinot Noir. After experimentation in many different microclimates in the region with different grape varieties, it was found the alluvial soils of the Gibbston Valley together with the Pinot Noir grape produced some of New Zealand’s finest Pinot Noir.

The original land use in the valley was extensive merino sheep farming and the Hawkshead Vineyard was once part of the large Waitiri Sheep Station. Waitiri Station had farmed the land since the early 1950′s and saw the potential for Viticulture, spending years recording information on climate and soil from their farm. As the land in the Gibbston Valley was developed for viticulture Denis Marshall was fortunate to be able to obtain a most suitable block in 1995 which was to become the Hawkshead Vineyard. The pinot noir grapes are planted on gentle north facing slopes to maximise the full year round sun.

In November 2009 Hawkshead Vineyard became a fully Accredited Vineyard under the Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand Programme. This was a stepping stone and from 2009 all their Pinot Noir has been grown organically.

Pinot Gris 2012 

2011 hh pg_thumb pinotgris hawks

Pinot Noir 2010

2010 hh pn mediumpinot noir hawks

 

 

 

Happy Wines from Otago Days

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Pairing Wine with the Last of the Summer Fruits

October 1, 2012 12:25 pm | Posted by Del

Pairing Wine with the Last of the Summer Fruits

FOOD and WINE PAIRINGPAIRING WINE WITH THE LAST OF THE SUMMER FRUITS
(continuation from blog  “ Food and Wine pairing”  dated 29 July 2012)

INTRODUCTION:—–this blog and the many more following will examine the pleasurable and often complex relationship between good food and wine, with the ultimate aim to assist our many discerning customers evolve the convivial bonding of good food and wine.

CHALLENGES : The main challenges when matching various fruits are often the differences in the acidity and ripeness of the fruit, for example the soft sweet flavours of a ripe pear and the slightly tartness of a late season raspberry. The key to this type of pairing is to match the weights and sugar intensity of both the wine and the fruit and to ensure one is not overpowering the other.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Apricot based dessert : goes well with a rich and flavoursome Sauternes – Chateau Rolland 

Blackberries : an outstanding match would be a wine of great depth Black Noble, De Bortoli Wines, Australia 

Blueberries : a superb partner would be a refreshing and energetic Emeri Sparkling Shiraz

Autumn Raspberries from Scotland : require a full bodied and luscious Muscat such as Muscat de Beaumes de Venise Tradition from the Rhone Valley.

Apple Crumble : go for a light delicate dessert wine from New Zealand Hukapapa Riesling, Hunters Wines, Marlborough

Pears Poached in Red Wine : will appreciate a quality  Sparkling Rose, Saumur Rose Brut, Ackerman, France 

Honey-Roasted Figs : this deliciously sticky dessert works well with the fresh fruity taste of Pineau des Charentes.

 

MAIN DIRECTORY:—–click on THE MARRIAGE OF FOOD AND WINE to access our quick search facility to locate hundreds of other food/wine/food pairing options, including hors-d’oeuvres, starters, soups, main courses and desserts. Also view GREAT FRIENDS – CHEESE AND WINE for cheese and wine pairing.

 

NEXT ARTICLE: Partridge,Pheasant, Teal and Mullard

HAPPY PAIRING WINE  WITH THE LAST OF THE SUMMER FRUITS

Graham D

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New Zealand Wines…Pinot Noir

April 28, 2009 12:06 pm | Posted by Del

A PASSION FOR PINOT NOIR

Pinot Noir is one of the more difficult grapes to grow and make into a fine wine, not only must the climate and soil characteristics must be right, the winemaker or oenologist’s skills also have a major part to play as do the forces of nature.  This wine at its best will leave a lasting impression on the palate and in the memory and a desire for more My passion comes with the appealing qualities of Pinot Noir – its soft, velvety texture, almost like imagining sensual liquid silk, it is unique and definitely my first love.
Its aroma is often one of the most complex of all varietals and can be intense with a ripe-grape or black cherry aroma, frequently accented by a pronounced spiciness that suggests cinnamon, sassafras, or mint. Ripe sweet tomato is also a common description for identifying Pinot Noir. It is full-bodied and rich but not heavy, high in alcohol, yet neither acidic nor tannic, with substantial flavour despite its delicacy.

One of my favourite Pinot Noirs has to be from Hunter’s Wines, Marlborough, New Zealand. I have known Jane Hunter for over 20 years and have always followed and sold her wines. She is the most acclaimed and awarded woman in New Zealand’s wine industry and was made OBE in 1993 for her services to the wine industry, recipient of a CNZM in the 2009 New Zealand New Year Honours List and most recently  World Class New Zealand 2009 Award. Jane is acknowledged as one of the first to capture international attention for Marlborough as an influential wine growing region. Her wines have won innumerable international medals, awards and accolades.  

hunters-pinotnoir1I have recently re-tasted Hunters Pinot Noir 2006 (16.50). This is an easy drinking wine with light, delicate cherry fruit. Savoury flavours mix with spicy characters on the palate.

Hunters Pinot Noir 2007 is wonderfully smooth and generous with ripe cherry, plum and raspberry fruit combined with a touch of sweet spice which is so characteristic of Pinot and then there is a soft clean finish. This wine will be available as from May/ June this year.

For the record, Jane Hunter also produces the following superb wines :

Sauvignon Blanc 2007 (14.57)
A classic Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc  with intense tropical/gooseberry flavours dominating the palate leaving a lingering finish

Kaho Roa Winemaker’s Selection Sauvignon Blanc 2005 (15.91)
hunters-kaho-roa2A subtle twist of oak blended with very ripe, slightly less overt gooseberry fruit character of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc. A very soft approachable wine

Chardonnay 2006 (15.91)
Rich and elegant with characteristically ripe fruit flavour, superbly balanced following maturation in French oak.

I can highly recommend Jane Hunter’s fine wines, they easily match other New Zealand wines that cost considerably more – I will mention no names

My perfect food match that also brings fond memories of New Zealand to mind, would be grilled snapper and Hunter’s Pinot Noir but for help in matching Pinot Noirs with food please click on www.ahadleigh-wine.com/wine-and-food/ which takes you to our websites specialist section on “MATCHING WINES WITH FOOD”, then just type in Pinot Noir in the box located under “TYPE IN WINE”

 

Happy Pinot Noir Days

 

 

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